Golpe de Estado in Honduras: No Twitter Revolution in Honduras

Source: AP

Source: AP

UPDATE: 4:15pm (June 29)

It isn’t just US Hondurans who are vast support of the coup in Honduras. It has been whitewashed in the national press, as if blocking access to roads, the internet and electricity as well as installing curfews and shooting citizens in the streets is warranted (Bov.net: “[A]pparently dodging bullets in the streets, which is sort of like Twittering, for poor people”).

It was not enough to point out the hypocrisy of those decrying Venezuela for its referendum on term limits in February as the same people vouched for the sanctity of Colombia’s counterinsurgency state despite Uribe’s still current bid to do the same. Zelaya, let’s not get it twisted, was placing the question to the people in the hopes of pursuing a policy of executive reelection, term limits or not. But was this enough for the military, in its first hemispheric action since the Cold War, to overthrow the democratically elected government of Honduras?

No it was not. Honduras, who last re-wrote its constitution in 1983, it states:

“The government is republican, democratic and representative” and “composed of three branches: legislative, executive and judicial, which are complementary, independent, and not subordinate to each other.” In practice, however, the executive branch has dominated the other two branches of government. Article 2, which states that sovereignty originates in the people, also includes a provision new to the 1982 constitution that labels the supplanting of popular sovereignty and the usurping of power as “crimes of treason against the fatherland.”

And pertaining to the military, which saw massive funding cuts following the end of the Cold War, and, in general, echoing the sentiments of de-militarization:

As set forth in Article 272, the armed forces are to be an “essentially professional, apolitical, obedient, and non-deliberative national institution”; in practice, however, the Honduran military essentially has enjoyed autonomy vis-à-vis civilian authority since 1957. The president retains the title of general commander over the armed forces, as provided in Article 245 (16). Orders given by the president to the armed forces, through its commander in chief, must be obeyed and executed, as provided in Article 278.

In general, the whole process of pontification and judgment is flawed. Honduras is unstable and the military provides stability – populism is bad, trickle down is good. This is clear because the question, from which Zelaya wishes to destroy Honduras: “Do you agree that, during the general elections of November 2009 there should be a fourth ballot to decide whether to hold a Constituent National Assembly that will approve a new political constitution?” Scandalous. In a sense it is – it’s implications will extend outward instead of upward.

No one is comparing the protests to Iran, and it’s clear why. Obviously there is no internet (or power) for the people of Honduras – a major problem for the fickle do-gooders in Western democracies. If one cannot see it, if one is not horrified – then it’s easy to look away. There will be no tweets from Honduras, no upper-class revolt. For Honduras, the upper-class, the oligarchical class, is against social movements and is, in fact, orchestrating and supporting the ideology of this coup. There is a surprising solidarity of classes protesting in Iran – it has way more wealth than Honduras – makes it easier for the West to support. Mousavi’s support for privatization and neoliberalism doesn’t hurt. Neither does the Honduran military’s.

For more:
Just RSS Eva Golinger’s blog, Postcards from the Revolution. An invaluable source.

Resource Guide for Honduras, Americas Society
“Honduras’ First Full Day Under Coup Rule,” Narco News
“Honduras: Old Coup Strategy, Different Stage,” Upside Down World
“A Few Thoughts on the Coup in Honduras,” Rebel Reports
“América Held Hostage: Day Two of the Coup in Honduras,” Narco News
“World Condemns Coup in Honduras,” Council on Hemispheric Affairs

Regional Organizations Speak Out Against Zelaya’s Removal from Office, Americas Quarterly
“Protesters Confront Soliders After Coup in Honduras”, New York Times
“Honduras’s New Government Vows to Maintain Power,” Washington Post
“Clinton: U.S. Not Declaring Events in Honduras a ‘Coup’,” Washington Post

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~ by Daniel on June 29, 2009.

One Response to “Golpe de Estado in Honduras: No Twitter Revolution in Honduras”

  1. […] Golpe de Estado in Honduras: No Twitter Revolution in Honduras To the Roots, Daniel Schmidt, 29 June 2009 http://totheroots.wordpress.com/2009/06/29/golpe-de-estado-in-honduras-no-twitter-revolution-in-honduras/ Extract: “No one is comparing the protests to Iran, and it’s clear why. Obviously there is no internet (or power) for the people of Honduras – a major problem for the fickle do-gooders in Western democracies. If one cannot see it, if one is not horrified – then it’s easy to look away. There will be no tweets from Honduras, no upper-class revolt. For Honduras, the upper-class, the oligarchical class, is against social movements and is, in fact, orchestrating and supporting the ideology of this coup. There is a surprising solidarity of classes protesting in Iran – it has way more wealth than Honduras – makes it easier for the West to support. Mousavi’s support for privatization and neoliberalism doesn’t hurt. Neither does the Honduran military’s.” […]

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